Division Problem Solving Questions

Division Problem Solving Questions-44
Read the tips and guidance and then work through the multiplication and division word problems in this lesson with your children.Try the three worksheets that are listed within the lesson (you will also find them at the bottom of the page.) In multiplicative comparison problems, there are two different sets being compared. The second set contains multiple copies of the first set."Bigger" can also mean "longer," or "wider," or "taller" in problems involving measurement, or "faster" in problems involving a rate of speed.

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It is very hands-on and a visual way for our children to understand what is happening when we are dividing.

To solve a word problem using repeated subtraction, students start with the number being divided up or the dividend.

Notice also how the importance of fully stating the answer and also of checking if the answer makes sense.

Whenever you finish a math problem of any kind, always go back to the original problem. ” Make sure that your final answer is a reasonable answer for the question you are being asked.

These problems in which you know both the number in the second set, and the multiplier are called “Set Size Unknown” comparisons, because the number in one set is the part that is unknown.

In order to answer the question you are being asked, you need to use the inverse operation of multiplication: division.Taking time to identify what is important, and what is not, is essential.Use a highlighter on written problems to identify words that tell you what you are solving, and give you clues about which operations to choose.Remember, whenever you finish a math word problem, always go back to the original problem. ” Make sure that your final answer is a reasonable answer for the question you are being asked. ” My answer is: My answer is reasonable because it tells how many books Paul read. In some multiplicative comparison word problems, you are given the number of items in one set, and you are given the number of items in the second set, which is a multiple of the first set.I divided a whole number by a whole number, so the number of Paul’s books should be less than the number of Jeff’s books. The “multiplier” amount is the part that is unknown.The hardest part of any word problem is deciding which operation to use.There can be so many details included in a word problem that the question being asked gets lost in the whole situation.I multiplied a whole number by a whole number, so the amount of money Mary saved this month should be more than she saved last month. You are given the amount of the second set, which is a multiple of the unknown first set, and the “multiplier” amount, which tells you how many times bigger (or more) the second set is than the first.Remember, “bigger” can also mean “longer,” or “wider,” or “taller” in problems involving measurement, or “faster” in problems involving a rate of speed.I was asked, “How much money did Mary save this month?” My answer is: My answer is reasonable because it tells how much money Mary saved this month. In some multiplicative comparison word problems, the part that is unknown is the number of items in one set.

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