Essay Egypt Crisis

Following the Japanese surprise attack on the Russian Pacific Fleet based at Port Arthur, the Russians sent reinforcements from their fleet in the Baltic Sea.The British denied the Russian fleet use of the canal and forced it to steam around Africa, giving the Japanese forces time to consolidate their position in East Asia.On 5 November, Britain and France landed paratroopers along the Suez Canal.

It later became clear that the Israeli invasion and the subsequent Anglo-French attack had been planned beforehand by the three countries. Eisenhower had strongly warned Britain not to invade; he threatened serious damage to the British financial system by selling the US government's pound sterling bonds.

The three allies had attained a number of their military objectives, but the canal was useless. Historians conclude the crisis "signified the end of Great Britain's role as one of the world's major powers".

was an invasion of Egypt in late 1956 by Israel, followed by the United Kingdom and France.

The aims were to regain Western control of the Suez Canal and to remove Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser, who had just nationalized the canal.

The economic potential of the Middle East, with its vast oil reserves, as well as the Suez Canal's geo-strategic importance against the background of the Cold War, prompted Britain to consolidate and strengthen its position there.

The kingdoms of Egypt and Iraq were seen as vital to maintaining strong British influence in the region.

In 1875, as a result of debt and financial crisis, Egypt was forced to sell its shares in the canal operating company to the British government of Benjamin Disraeli.

They were willing buyers and obtained a 44 percent share in the canal's operations for less than £4 million; this maintained the majority shareholdings of the mostly French private investors.

Egypt's post-war domestic politics were experiencing a radical change, prompted in no small part by economic instability, inflation, and unemployment.

Unrest began to manifest itself in the growth of radical political groups, such as the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, and an increasingly hostile attitude towards Britain and its presence in the country.

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