Essay Of Studies By Francis Bacon Summary

Studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability.

And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not.

Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtle; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Nay, there is no stond or impediment in the wit but may be wrought out by fit studies; like as diseases of the body may have appropriate exercises.

If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the Schoolmen; for they are [splitters of hairs].

If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers’ cases.

These people only want to improve themselves in the eyes of others.

These are the people who try to better themselves by bragging about their acheivements and accomplishments in conversation with others.

He articulated that, "studies serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability." Bacon felt that some people gain knowledge for pure delight.

People, who acquire knowledge for delight, do so because they enjoy it.

Then there are those who gain knowledge for ability.

They want to show that they are able to do something. Ability is widely used in the area of business, those who are well educated rather than those who are not better run a company.

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