Essays Montaigne Quotes

Essays Montaigne Quotes-81
Amongst those laws that relate to the dead, I look upon that to be very sound by which the actions of princes are to be examined after their decease.And such as, out of respect to some private obligation, unjustly espouse and vindicate the memory of a faulty prince, do private right at the expense of public justice.“Because,” said he, “I could think of no other remedy against thy perpetual mischiefs.” But the public and universal testimonies that were given of him after his death (and so will be to all posterity, both of him and all other wicked princes like him), of his tyrannies and abominable deportment, who, of a sound judgment, can reprove them?

Amongst those laws that relate to the dead, I look upon that to be very sound by which the actions of princes are to be examined after their decease.

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“The most terrible and violent of our own afflictions is to despise our own beings” “On the highest throne, we are seated, still, upon our arses” “Everything is too complicated for men to understand” “The man who thinks he knows something does not know yet what knowing is” “Why torment yourself with worries that are outside your self control?

are a work by Michel de Montaigne published from 1580 to 1588.

Livy does very truly say, “That the language of men bred up in courts is always full of vain ostentation and false testimony, every one indifferently magnifying his own master, and stretching his commendation to the utmost extent of virtue and sovereign grandeur.” Some may condemn the freedom of those two soldiers who so roundly answered Nero to his beard; the one being asked by him why he bore him ill-will?

“I loved thee,” answered he, “whilst thou wert worthy of it, but since thou are become a parricide, an incendiary, a player, and a coachman, I hate thee as thou dost deserve.” And the other, why he should attempt to kill him?

It is the work of a fifty year old man , returning from a long trip over Europe (read the great book of the world) and, anxious to check if he lived well, engages in a kind of self-analysis: self-analysis conducted at random, not to “prove” but for “the pleasure of understanding”, and which gradually reveals the contradictions of his own nature.

What added soon feel equally profound contradictions of moral precepts that have been taught by his teachers or his reading, the customs of every country he visited.The French Renaissance essayist Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592) argues that it may be prudent not to criticise a “faulty prince” while he is alive but once he has died we owe it to ourselves and to posterity to expose their crimes and wickedness: Amongst those laws that relate to the dead, I look upon that to be very sound by which the actions of princes are to be examined after their decease.They are equals with, if not masters of the laws, and, therefore, what justice could not inflict upon their persons, ’tis but reason should be executed upon their reputations and the estates of their successors—things that we often value above life itself.Socrates declared himself to be a citizen of the world, not merely Athens, and we should tell ourselves (and others if you choose to be vocal) the same.Montaigne felt that most university graduates were “blockheads”.Teach yourself and develop the skills that really matter in life: how to live well, deal with death, end a relationship, and confront anxieties (among so many others).Work on your humility and modesty, and accept your intellectual limitations.What conclusions should be draw from these essays ?Montaigne learned to paint himself, and through him, the human condition.It concludes with skepticism, expressed in his famous motto: What do I know?Far from leading to a mistrust of men, this attitude of doubt leads to a universal good will and a way of life based on understanding of our weaknesses.

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