Essays On Entertainment And Society

Essays On Entertainment And Society-80
Eliot defines culture as existing in, and through, three different spheres: that of the individual, the group or class, and the entire rest of society.Individuals’ sensibilities affiliate them with a group or class, which doesn’t have to be the one they’re born into.My favorite headline read: “Enrique Iglesias’ Mom Just Broke Up the Marriage of Nobel Winner Mario Vargas Llosa, 79.” Since the scandal broke, his numbers have been up, in English and in Spanish, on the only Amazon that people seem to care about.

Eliot defines culture as existing in, and through, three different spheres: that of the individual, the group or class, and the entire rest of society.Individuals’ sensibilities affiliate them with a group or class, which doesn’t have to be the one they’re born into.My favorite headline read: “Enrique Iglesias’ Mom Just Broke Up the Marriage of Nobel Winner Mario Vargas Llosa, 79.” Since the scandal broke, his numbers have been up, in English and in Spanish, on the only Amazon that people seem to care about.

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That group or class proceeds to exercise its idea of culture on society as a whole, with the elites — the educated and artists, in Eliot’s ideal arrangement — ­leveraging their access to the media and academia to influence the tastes of the average citizen, and of the next ­generation too.

As for what forms the individual, it’s the family, and the family, in turn, is formed by the church: “It is in Christianity that our arts have developed,” Eliot writes; “it is in Christianity that the laws of Europe have — until recently — been rooted.”“Until recently” refers to the year of Eliot’s essay’s publication: 1943.

, a popular Spanish magazine, for a large amount of money.

After the review was published, Vargas Llosa contacted The Times to say that none of these assertions were true.

But instead of pointing out that the most interesting literary culture on the planet, post-1968, was being made by Cortázar (Argentina), Donoso (Chile), Fuentes (Mexico), García Márquez ­(Colombia), Puig (Argentina) and, hey, himself, Vargas Llosa instead mourns the lack of an audience, as if novels ever could, or should, make the same box office as a blockbuster.

It’s here, in the essay “The Civilization of the Spectacle,” that Vargas Llosa falls into contradiction — exhorting more people to read more, even while decrying the deleterious effects of “democratization”:“This is a phenomenon born of altruism: Culture could no longer be the patrimony of an elite; liberal and democratic society had a moral obligation to make culture accessible to all, through education and through promoting and supporting the arts, literature and other cultural expression.

I call it the newspaper problem: About a decade ago I wrote an essay on contemporary poetry for a newspaper that will remain nameless, and had the occasion to quote a line by “Eliot.” The editor sent back many changes, the most telling of which was that the quotation was now attributed to “the English poet T. Eliot.” Vaguely piqued, I asked what the editor was trying to clarify: Was he afraid readers wouldn’t realize the quotation came from a poem?

Or was he afraid readers might confuse the Eliot who wrote it with, say, George Eliot, the pseudonymous author of “Middlemarch”?

In reviewing this complaint, editors determined that the reviewer had based his account of these matters mostly on information from an article about Vargas Llosa in The Daily Mail, but neither the reviewer nor editors independently verified those statements.

Using such information is at odds with The Times’s journalistic standards, and it should not have been included in the review.

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