Federalist Essays Definition

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Written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, the essays originally appeared anonymously in New York newspapers in 17 under the pen name "Publius." The Federalist Papers are considered one of the most important sources for interpreting and understanding the original intent of the Constitution.

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However, computer analysis and historical evidence has led nearly all historians to assign authorship in the following manner: Hamilton wrote numbers 1, 6–9, 11–13, 15–17, 21–36, 59–61, and 65–85; Madison, numbers 10, 14, 18–20, 37–58, and 62–63; and Jay, numbers 2–5 and 64.

The authors of the Federalist papers presented a masterly defense of the new federal system and of the major departments in the proposed central government.

Few people, he believed, will have the knowledge and the integrity to judge the law, and those deemed adequate to the office must be retained rather than replaced. Reprint, New York: New American Library of World Literature, 1961. (essays by Alexander Hamilton, james Madison, and john jay written to persuade voters to ratify the new constitution) that the dangers of too much democracy were ever present in the minds of those who crafted and fought for the adoption of a constitution calculated to provide a safer structure for the protection and preservation of private property., foreign policy, the political economy of Hamilton's favored vision of a meritocratic "natural aristocracy," and differences between Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson over issues of revolution and slavery.

The judiciary must also be independent, according to Hamilton, so that it may fulfill its main purpose in a constitutional government: the protection of the "particular rights or privileges" of the people as set forth by the Constitution. To protect those rights, he proclaimed, the judiciary must be given the power of Judicial Review to declare as null and void laws that it deems unconstitutional. The courts had embraced judicial review by the twentieth century, leading some critics to maintain that the overly active use of judicial review had given the courts too much power. Hamilton, a New Yorker who served as treasury secretary under President George Washington from 1789 to 1795, was the principal architect of The Federalist Papers.

This theme was predominant in late 18th-century political thought in America and accounts in part for the elaborate system of checks and balances that was devised in the Constitution.

The authors of the Federalist papers argued against the decentralization of political authority under the Articles of Confederation.

There were 85 essays written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison.

These essays were written under the pseudonym Publius. Of theses essays, most of them were published in 17.

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