Peaceful Coexistence Cold War Essay

Peaceful Coexistence Cold War Essay-80
S.’s view of a major foreign power, and thus our relations with that power, than any other American in modern history.That the power in question was the Soviet Union, and the time in question the crucial period after World War II, made his outsized influence all the more remarkable. officials who guided the nation’s foreign policy in the Cold War, Kennan became the preeminent guide of all things Russia. side of the adversarial relationship, Kennan was deeply enamoured with Russia.

S.’s view of a major foreign power, and thus our relations with that power, than any other American in modern history.That the power in question was the Soviet Union, and the time in question the crucial period after World War II, made his outsized influence all the more remarkable. officials who guided the nation’s foreign policy in the Cold War, Kennan became the preeminent guide of all things Russia. side of the adversarial relationship, Kennan was deeply enamoured with Russia.

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“Freedom of thought is the only guarantee against an infection of mankind by mass myths, which, in the hands of treacherous hypocrites and demagogues, can be transformed into bloody dictatorships,” he wrote.

Suddenly the Soviet Union’s most decorated physicist became its most prominent dissident.

Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan disagreed about many specific policies, but both presidents linked human rights and foreign policy.

President Carter treated Soviet dissidents not as distractions but as respected partners in a united struggle for freedom.

President Reagan went further, tying the fate of specific dissidents to America’s relations with what he called the “evil empire.”Approaching the fight to win the Cold War as a human rights crusade as well as a national security priority energized Americans.

It reminded them that, regardless of the guilt and defeatism of the Vietnam War or the shame and cynicism of Watergate, the country remained a beacon of liberty.

For this work and other “thought crimes” the Soviet authorities stripped Sakharov of his honors, imprisoned many of his associates and, eventually, exiled him to Gorky. Although we dared not discuss it, my peers and I lived a life of double-think: toeing the Communist Party line in public, thinking independently in private.

In 1968, when this work was published, I was a 20-year-old mathematician studying at the Moscow equivalent of M. Like so many others, I read Sakharov’s essay in samizdat — a typewritten copy duplicated secretly, spread informally and read hungrily.

Its message was unsettling and liberating: You cannot be a good scientist or a free person while living a double life.

Knowing the truth while collaborating in the regime’s lies only produces bad science and broken souls.

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