Safety In Factory Essay

Safety In Factory Essay-28
Generally, electric shocks or electrocutions are thought of as the main hazards associated with electrical work.According to Foley, however, 75 percent of all reported lost time electrical-related incidents are due to burn injuries from the arc flash.While these are most certainly not the only hazards encountered by power plant workers, they are definitely worth review.

Generally, electric shocks or electrocutions are thought of as the main hazards associated with electrical work.According to Foley, however, 75 percent of all reported lost time electrical-related incidents are due to burn injuries from the arc flash.While these are most certainly not the only hazards encountered by power plant workers, they are definitely worth review.

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“An arc can reach 10 feet from the source, so it is important for anyone working near an electrical cabinet or similar electrical equipment to be protected,” Foley adds.

OSHA sets many of the electrical safety rules for general industry and for utility workers.

The same, however, is not required for qualified utility workers.

The requirements for a qualified worker dictate that the worker wear clothing that will not worsen an electrical injury – most likely an arc-flash burn.

Comprehensive training, detailed pre-job planning, and proper and well-maintained safety equipment are key to accident prevention, regardless of the hazard.

Among the most common hazards to power plant workers are electrical shocks and burns, boiler fires and explosions, and contact with hazardous chemicals.He also points out that this figure does not represent costs associated with severe injuries, such as burns, that do not cause death.Because of the expense associated with treating serious burns, the long recovery time associated with them and the debilitating nature of burns, the costs can be much more than the National Safety Council’s

Among the most common hazards to power plant workers are electrical shocks and burns, boiler fires and explosions, and contact with hazardous chemicals.

He also points out that this figure does not represent costs associated with severe injuries, such as burns, that do not cause death.

Because of the expense associated with treating serious burns, the long recovery time associated with them and the debilitating nature of burns, the costs can be much more than the National Safety Council’s $1 million estimate.

Preparing the troops Power plants are much safer than they once were; however, plant employees still encounter hazards.

Training, along with proper operation and maintenance procedures, are key to reducing accidents and mitigating their effects.

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Among the most common hazards to power plant workers are electrical shocks and burns, boiler fires and explosions, and contact with hazardous chemicals.He also points out that this figure does not represent costs associated with severe injuries, such as burns, that do not cause death.Because of the expense associated with treating serious burns, the long recovery time associated with them and the debilitating nature of burns, the costs can be much more than the National Safety Council’s $1 million estimate.Preparing the troops Power plants are much safer than they once were; however, plant employees still encounter hazards.Training, along with proper operation and maintenance procedures, are key to reducing accidents and mitigating their effects.“In the past 15 to 20 years, we’ve learned that the arc flash, not the shock, causes most injuries,” Foley says.“Industry has addressed shock hazards well, but not until recently the arc flash.”Often, the person actually working in an electrical cabinet is wearing proper protection, but others, who may be working with that person but not directly in the cabinet, are not protected at all.Although these numbers may not seem that large when compared to the total number of people working around electrical hazards, even one death or serious accident can be extremely costly and devastating to a company.The National Safety Council estimates that an electrocution death costs about $1 million.According to Foley, OSHA’s logic is focused on the belief that electric utility workers are better trained on electricity and its potential hazards and should be more knowledgeable about electrical safety than general industry workers.Much of OSHA’s regulation for electrical hazards defaults to NFPA’s Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace – NFPA Standard 70E.

million estimate.Preparing the troops Power plants are much safer than they once were; however, plant employees still encounter hazards.Training, along with proper operation and maintenance procedures, are key to reducing accidents and mitigating their effects.“In the past 15 to 20 years, we’ve learned that the arc flash, not the shock, causes most injuries,” Foley says.“Industry has addressed shock hazards well, but not until recently the arc flash.”Often, the person actually working in an electrical cabinet is wearing proper protection, but others, who may be working with that person but not directly in the cabinet, are not protected at all.Although these numbers may not seem that large when compared to the total number of people working around electrical hazards, even one death or serious accident can be extremely costly and devastating to a company.The National Safety Council estimates that an electrocution death costs about

Among the most common hazards to power plant workers are electrical shocks and burns, boiler fires and explosions, and contact with hazardous chemicals.

He also points out that this figure does not represent costs associated with severe injuries, such as burns, that do not cause death.

Because of the expense associated with treating serious burns, the long recovery time associated with them and the debilitating nature of burns, the costs can be much more than the National Safety Council’s $1 million estimate.

Preparing the troops Power plants are much safer than they once were; however, plant employees still encounter hazards.

Training, along with proper operation and maintenance procedures, are key to reducing accidents and mitigating their effects.

||

Among the most common hazards to power plant workers are electrical shocks and burns, boiler fires and explosions, and contact with hazardous chemicals.He also points out that this figure does not represent costs associated with severe injuries, such as burns, that do not cause death.Because of the expense associated with treating serious burns, the long recovery time associated with them and the debilitating nature of burns, the costs can be much more than the National Safety Council’s $1 million estimate.Preparing the troops Power plants are much safer than they once were; however, plant employees still encounter hazards.Training, along with proper operation and maintenance procedures, are key to reducing accidents and mitigating their effects.“In the past 15 to 20 years, we’ve learned that the arc flash, not the shock, causes most injuries,” Foley says.“Industry has addressed shock hazards well, but not until recently the arc flash.”Often, the person actually working in an electrical cabinet is wearing proper protection, but others, who may be working with that person but not directly in the cabinet, are not protected at all.Although these numbers may not seem that large when compared to the total number of people working around electrical hazards, even one death or serious accident can be extremely costly and devastating to a company.The National Safety Council estimates that an electrocution death costs about $1 million.According to Foley, OSHA’s logic is focused on the belief that electric utility workers are better trained on electricity and its potential hazards and should be more knowledgeable about electrical safety than general industry workers.Much of OSHA’s regulation for electrical hazards defaults to NFPA’s Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace – NFPA Standard 70E.

million.According to Foley, OSHA’s logic is focused on the belief that electric utility workers are better trained on electricity and its potential hazards and should be more knowledgeable about electrical safety than general industry workers.Much of OSHA’s regulation for electrical hazards defaults to NFPA’s Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace – NFPA Standard 70E.

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